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Learning at Work Week

To celebrate learning at work week, we are encouraging you to take time out of your day – whether that be during your commute to work, your dinner break, or staff meetings to discuss all the ins and outs of children’s cancer to raise awareness for the illness that many of our children endure on a day to day basis; just as you endure your daily routine of work.

All About Children’s Cancer

Shocking statistics tell us that 1 in 500 children will be diagnosed with cancer before they are 14 years old, and that although 75% will survive, sadly 60% of those who do will suffer from “late-effects” of the treatments. Children that are diagnosed with cancer will suffer from a term known as ‘late effects’ at some point in their life, and these effects themselves can be harsher than cancer. Young people are often left with issues in relation to standard growth development, organ and tissue development, learning and memory capability…and not to mention the emotional affect that cancer can have on a child. Overall cancer in children can leave effects that last a life time – although the cancer could be gone forever, the late effects will remain.

What Causes Children’s Cancer?

Much different to cancer in adults, children’s cancer is not thought to have a particular cause. In adults, the diagnoses of cancer is often linked to particular life-style choices, and therefore can be (in a lot of cases) avoided. However, the cause of children’s cancer is unknown to doctors. The mutations occur very early in life and quite often even before birth, and so it can affect any family.

How is Children’s Cancer Different?

Typically the types of cancer that are found in children affect the blood cells, Lymph system, Brain, Liver or the bones. Although they can still occur it is less likely for a child to be affected by cancers such as prostate, breast, colon and lung.

Considering that children’s cells are still developing when they are treated for cancer, some of their healthy cells will be damaged during the process – leading to the ‘late effects’. Sadly of the children diagnosed with cancer, around 25% will not live to see their 30th birthday

What Are The Different Treatments?

Depending on the size and position of a tumour, the first port of call may be surgery which aims to remove the tumour. If the tumour is too large or in a difficult position, other treatments such as chemotherapy may be used to reduce the size of the tumour. The survival rate for children’s cancer has more than doubled since the 1960s, when fewer than 30% of children survived childhood cancer. Today around 75% will survive to the age of 30 or more because of the advancements in cancer treatments. Although 30 years old is no long life span…this allows children to at least gain some amazing experiences during their time.

So, with all that in mind, think about the day to day life-style for a child with cancer in comparison to your day to day life-style. Children are suffering with everything that cancer at a young age brings with it all the time, and it’s important to understand the effect that it leaves behind. We are encouraging everyone to discuss children’s cancer at work this week with their colleagues to spread awareness for everyone.

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